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Way, way back in the 1990s, stores knew you and what you liked. Then online shopping came along and many mom-and-pops closed up shop. In 5 years, the little guys will have fought back to give online retail a taste of its own medicine.  See your world in five years…

thenewinquiry:

Because likability is now so visible, so prevalent as the preferred emotional response to brands and ideas, users have predictably called for the expansion of the emotional repertoire. They call for a Dislike button. At first glance, we might think this binary-emotional expansion would be welcome to marketers: it would add to their collected data on our desires. However, marketing’s sub-field of Liking Studies has already revealed that disliked ads poison everything they touch. Negative sentiment – disliking – is asymmetrical in its power to shape consumer’s opinions of a brand: for every 10 likes, 1 dislike could tear a brand apart. Such negative emotion requires much brand damage control. One thing Facebook will never do, then, is install a Dislike button.
This is not to say that Facebook won’t introduce other binary-emotional switches. Facebook’s flirtation with a Want button indicates their potential willingness to expand our binary-emotional repertoire. One could imagine users getting a Love button. But we are not allowed to dislike.And herein lies a way out of the Like Economy. Dissent, dissensus, refusal are not easily afforded in Facebook. Dissenters have to work for it: they have to write out comments, start up a blog, seek out other dislikers. They are not lulled into slackivism or “clickivism,” replacing the work of activism with clicking “like” on a cause as if the sheer aggregate of sentiment will make someone somewhere change something.
-“A History of Like” by Robert W. Gehl

thenewinquiry:

Because likability is now so visible, so prevalent as the preferred emotional response to brands and ideas, users have predictably called for the expansion of the emotional repertoire. They call for a Dislike button. At first glance, we might think this binary-emotional expansion would be welcome to marketers: it would add to their collected data on our desires. However, marketing’s sub-field of Liking Studies has already revealed that disliked ads poison everything they touch. Negative sentiment – disliking – is asymmetrical in its power to shape consumer’s opinions of a brand: for every 10 likes, 1 dislike could tear a brand apart. Such negative emotion requires much brand damage control. One thing Facebook will never do, then, is install a Dislike button.

This is not to say that Facebook won’t introduce other binary-emotional switches. Facebook’s flirtation with a Want button indicates their potential willingness to expand our binary-emotional repertoire. One could imagine users getting a Love button. But we are not allowed to dislike.And herein lies a way out of the Like Economy. Dissent, dissensus, refusal are not easily afforded in Facebook. Dissenters have to work for it: they have to write out comments, start up a blog, seek out other dislikers. They are not lulled into slackivism or “clickivism,” replacing the work of activism with clicking “like” on a cause as if the sheer aggregate of sentiment will make someone somewhere change something.

-“A History of Like” by Robert W. Gehl

Survived the red eye and made it to this in NYC!  Can’t believe they let us land, but let the weekend of best friends begin!!

Survived the red eye and made it to this in NYC! Can’t believe they let us land, but let the weekend of best friends begin!!

garik:

“Everything is nothing, with a twist.”
Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

garik:

“Everything is nothing, with a twist.”

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

#spie advanced litho conference!

#spie advanced litho conference!

Saaan fraaan (at Cliff House)

Saaan fraaan (at Cliff House)

Roast, vegetarian style

Roast, vegetarian style

Homemade coat rack!

Homemade coat rack!

Bright Death

Bright Death

This is actually composed of 1 million, micron sized hearts.  They are just too small to see by eye ;) #nanofabart

This is actually composed of 1 million, micron sized hearts. They are just too small to see by eye ;) #nanofabart

train of thought

struggled to remember something something…..metals….resonance frequency….transparency…..

Finally found the thread

-> Plasma Frequency: “Plasmons play a large role in the optical properties of metalsLight of frequency below the plasma frequency is reflected, because the electrons in the metal screen the electric fieldof the light. Light of frequency above the plasma frequency is transmitted, because the electrons cannot respond fast enough to screen it.”-wiki plasmons

      ->Ponderomotive:”However, there are secondary effects on the electrons in the plasma from the magnetic field of the electromagnetic wave. This gives rise to what is called the ponderamotive force. If I recall correctly, the ponderamotive force is what allows the wave to eventually propagate.” - physics forum

In physics, a ponderomotive force is a nonlinear force that a charged particle experiences in an inhomogeneous oscillating electromagnetic field.” -wiki ponderomotive

                ->Geometric diodes: “We need some sort of non-linear effect to make this work!” -Garret Moddel, my old advisor

hm.

then….

Frisbee.

         

just need more of this in my life.

just need more of this in my life.

(Source: togifs)

compartments for brains

my broken brain fails to compartmentalize anything.

Science class then english.  Lets blend

Math then art.  BLEND

I thought, brilliant, wouldn’t it be?  But maybe nobody but me could benefit.  Would it even be possible?

Maybe if we’re willing to give up compartmentalized things like microwaves only made for heating food and pictures just for looking at.

The roots of our beliefs about weather forecasts—what they’re worth and who we trust to provide them—can be traced to magic, mysticism, and the supernatural. Predictions are essentially prophecies, and prophecies about the weather are as old as Genesis. Noah knew 100 years before the rains arrived, Moses gave a ten-plague forecast to Pharaoh, and Ezekiel predicted the kind of extreme weather the Weather Channel only wishes it could cover. Forecasting was an easier job back then; God did not beat around the bush. But it was also a sacred duty and a selfless act.

Singing birds awake me with songs of new beginnings